Category Archives: Trigger

Benefits of Right-brain thinking – article

Benefits of The Right Brain by Richard Stammler
extracts

Other creative people have deliberately employed techniques
to activate the right brain for problem solving, writing
ideas, and other creative solutions. Any sort of
dissociation, disconnecting from the everyday world gets
you there. For example, Edison is purported to have used
the hypnogogic state to stimulate creativity. The
hypnogogic state is that state just prior to falling
asleep. He activated this state for creative problem
solving by placing himself in his easy chair holding metal
bearings in his hand, which was positioned over a metal
bowl. Then as he relaxed into that state between sleeping
and waking, called the hypnogogic state, if he fell asleep,
his hand would release the metal balls, which would then
wake him as they fell into the bowl. This is an example of
the use of the dissociated state, which is a hallmark of
the “right brain” and has been used by various means by
many creative people. Most don’t understand that is what
they are doing. There are many ways to activate this part
of the mind. For most people repetitive activities, special
music, or just day dreaming will do the job. It’s achieving
a dissociative state that quiets the left brain and
activates the right brain. I knew a General officer who,
after getting briefed on a vexing question, would state,
“that is one for jogging.” By that he meant that he would
bring the question to mind while jogging. Jogging or
running entails repetitive action and may also include some
hypoxia known as the “runner’s high” and brings on this
dissociative state.

This is actually what is going on when people say they
“will sleep on it” before coming to a decision. As early as
the ancient Greeks, dreams were elevated to forecast the
future and provide specific guidance to the dreamer. A
premium was placed on those who seemed to be able to
accurately interpret the dream. When they needed healing,
the ancient Greeks visited temples of Asklepios, the Greek
god of healing, where priests advised them how to incubate
a healing dream. Dream researchers and modern healers have
resurrected and updated this ancient practice4 and detail a
step-by-step process on how to incubate a dream. To
incubate a dream means to have a dream that is focused on
solving a specific problem or question. For the
transpersonal therapist the dream is “the royal road to the
unconscious” and the unconscious holds virtually all the
clues to unraveling any problem in physical reality. There
is an infinite wealth of information and guidance in the
unconscious, which can be coaxed to conscious awareness for
the personality’s benefit. The dream is a prime method to
do this. Therefore, it is not unusual to hear of a famous
writer, artist or scientist, anyone engaged in a creative
process, who uses either the dream state or the transition
into and out of sleep (the hypnogogic and hypnopompic
states, respectively) to get specific answers, solve
creative problems and get inspiration.

Age of the right brain – article

Let Computers Compute. It’s the Age of the Right Brain.

“Imagination is more important than knowledge.”
— Albert Einstein

I’M of two minds. As a matter of fact, so are you. And
until recently, corporate America wasn’t doing much to take
advantage of one of them. But now that we’re hip-deep in
what has been called both the “Creative Economy” and the
“Conceptual Age,” no one can afford to ignore the artist
within: the right hemisphere of the brain.

Although popularized in the 1980s by the artist Betty
Edwards in her book “Drawing on the Right Side of the
Brain,” the right-brain-left-brain dichotomy originated
with the research of the American biologist Roger W. Sperry
in the 1960s. Through studying “split brain” animals and
human patients, whose brain hemispheres had been
disconnected (in humans, this was done to prevent severe
epileptic seizures), he found that each side of the brain
plays its own role in cognition. The left side, home of the
human language center, is the outspoken logical, linear
half of the equation. The right side, home to spatial
perception and nonverbal concepts, is the nonlinear, high-
concept source of the imagination and of pleasure.

The two function cheek-by-jowl, constantly sending signals
back and forth through a bundle of 200 million to 300
million nerve fibers to help balance learning, analysis and
communication throughout the brain.

But now that computers can emulate many of the sequential
skills of the brain’s left hemisphere — the part that sees
the individual trees in a forest — the author Daniel Pink
argues that it’s time for our imaginative right brain,
which sees the entire forest all at once, to take center
stage.

“These abilities have always been part of what it means to
be human,” notes Mr. Pink, who synthesized his ideas about
the new role of right-brain thinking in his 2005 book “A
Whole New Mind.” “It’s just that after a few generations in
the Information Age, many of our high-concept, high-touch
muscles have atrophied. The challenge is to work them back
into shape.”

Why bother? Because much of the left-brain-centric work
that the Information Age workers of America once did —
computer programming, financial accounting, routing calls —
is now done more cheaply in Asia or more efficiently by
computers. If it can be outsourced or automated, it
probably has been.

Now the master of fine arts, or M.F.A., Mr. Pink says, “is
the new M.B.A.”

He’s not the only one saying it. When General Motors hired
Robert A. Lutz in 2001 to whip its product development into
shape, he told The New York Times about his new approach.
“It’s more right brain. It’s more creative,” he said.

“I see us as being in the art business,” he said, “art,
entertainment and mobile sculpture, which, coincidentally,
also happens to provide transportation.”

When a car company like G.M. is in the art business, every
company in any other industry is, too.

So it makes sense that business executives are turning to
the original pop culture icon of right-brain thinking,
“Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain,” for guidance into
their right minds. Ms. Edwards retired in 1998, but her
son, Brian Bomeisler, teaches scores of corporate and
public workshops each year.

The list of companies Mr. Bomeisler has worked with is a
Who’s Who of the Fortune 500. “That corny phrase ‘thinking
outside the box,’ that’s what I do for corporations,” he
says. “In teaching them how to draw, I’m teaching them an
entirely new way to see. They unbox their minds and absorb
what’s really there, with all of the complexity and beauty.
One of the common phrases that students use afterward is
that the world appears to be so much richer.”

During a two-day workshop with Halliburton Energy Services,
Mr. Bomeisler watched as a team’s drawings slowly revealed
an obvious solution to a longstanding problem. Team members
realized from drawing that they had been enjoying their
special status as a task force and had become so fascinated
with the problem before them that they were in no hurry to
solve it. This was resolved after management set a strict
deadline and promised the group equally intriguing problems
in the future.

By JANET RAE-DUPREE
Published: April 6, 2008

Useful information on right/left-brain thinking

Betty Edwards has used the terms L-Mode and R-Mode to
designate two ways of knowing and seeing – the verbal,
analytic mode and the visual, perceptual mode – no matter
where they are located in the individual brain. You are
probably aware of these different characteristics. L-mode
is a step-by-step style of thinking, using words, numbers
and other symbols. L-mode strings things out in sequences,
like words in a sentence. R-mode on the other hand, uses
visual information and processes, not step-by-step, but all
at once, like recognizing the face of a friend.

“You have two brains: a left and a right. Modern brain
scientists now know that your left brain is your verbal and
rational brain; it thinks serially and reduces its thoughts
to numbers, letters and words… Your right brain is your
nonverbal and intuitive brain; it thinks in patterns, or
pictures, composed of ‘whole things,’ and does not
comprehend reductions, either numbers, letters, or words.”

From The Fabric of Mind, by the eminent scientist and
neurosurgeon, Richard Bergland. Viking Penguin, Inc., New
York 1985. pg.1

Right brain, left brain, creativity and more

The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Betty
Edwards

Extracts

Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, I believe, was one
of the first practical educational applications of Roger
Sperry’s pioneering insight into the dual nature of human
thinking—verbal, analytic thinking mainly located in the
left hemisphere, and visual, perceptual thinking mainly
located in the right hemisphere. Since 1979, many writers
in other fields have proposed applications of the research,
each in turn suggesting new ways to enhance both thinking
modes, thereby increasing potential for personal growth.

Like other global skills—for example, reading, driving,
skiing, and walking—drawing is made up of component skills
that become integrated into a whole skill. Once you have
learned the components and have integrated them, you can
draw—just as once you have learned to read, you know how to
read for life; once you have learned to walk, you know how
to walk for life. You don’t have to go on forever adding
additional basic skills. Progress takes the form of
practice, refinement of technique, and learning what to use
the skills for.

This was an exciting discovery because it meant that a
person can learn to draw within a reasonably short time.

Five basic skills of drawing The global skill of drawing a
perceived object, person, landscape (something that you see
“out there”) requires only five basic component skills, no
more. These skills are not drawing skills. They are
perceptual skills, listed as follows:
One: the perception of edges
Two: the perception of spaces
Three: the perception of relationships
Four: the perception of lights and shadows
Five: the perception of the whole, or gestalt

I am aware, of course, that additional basic skills are
required for imaginative, expressive drawing leading to
“Art with a capital A.” Of these, I have found two and only
two additional skills: drawing from memory and drawing from
imagination. And there remain, naturally, many techniques
of drawing—many ways of manipulating drawing mediums and
endless subject matter, for example. But, to repeat, for
skilful realistic drawing of one’s perceptions, using
pencil on paper, the five skills I will teach you in this
book provide the required perceptual training.

Those five basic skills are the prerequisites for effective
use of the two additional “advanced” skills, and the set of
seven may constitute the entire basic global skill of
drawing. Many books on drawing actually focus mainly on the
two advanced skills.

In order to gain access to the sub-dominant visual,
perceptual R-mode of the brain, it is necessary to present
the brain with a job that the verbal, analytic L-mode will
turn down. For most of us, L-mode thinking seems easy,
normal, and familiar (though perhaps not for many children
and dyslexic individuals). The perverse R-mode strategy, in
contrast, may seem difficult and unfamiliar—even “off-the-
wall.” It must be learned in opposition to the “natural”
tendency of the brain to favour L-mode because, in general,
language dominates. By learning to control this tendency
for specific tasks, one gains access to powerful brain
functions often obscured by language.

In short, in the process of learning to draw, one also
learns to control (at least to some degree) the mode by
which one’s own brain handles information. Perhaps this
explains in part why my book appeals to individuals from
such diverse fields. Intuitively, they see the link to
other activities and the possibility of seeing things
differently by learning to access R-mode at conscious
level.

Over the past decade or so, a new interdisciplinary field
of brain-function study has become formally known as
cognitive neuroscience. In addition to the traditional
discipline of neurology, cognitive neuroscience encompasses
study of other higher cognitive processes such as language,
memory, and perception. Computer scientists, linguists,
neuro-imaging scientists, cognitive psychologists, and
neurobiologists are all contributing to a growing
understanding of how the human brain functions.

Interest in “right brain, left brain” research has subsided
somewhat among educators and the general public since Roger
Sperry first published his research findings. Nevertheless,
the fact of the profound asymmetry of human brain functions
remains, becoming ever more central, for example, among
computer scientists trying to emulate human mental
processes. Facial recognition, a function ascribed to the
right hemisphere, has been sought for decades and is still
beyond the capabilities of most computers.

Ray Kurzweil, in his recent book The Age of Spiritual
Machines (Viking, 1999) contrasted human and computer
capability in pattern seeking (as in facial recognition)
and sequential processing (as in calculation):

The human brain has about 100 billion neurons. With an
estimated average of one thousand connections between each
neuron and its neighbours, we have about 100 trillion
connections, each capable of a simultaneous calculation.
That’s rather massive parallel processing, and one key to
the strength of human thinking. A profound weakness,
however, is the excruciatingly slow speed of neural
circuitry, only 200 calculations per second. For problems
that benefit from massive parallelism, such a neural-net-
based pattern recognition, the human brain does a great
job. For problems that require extensive sequential
thinking, the human brain is only mediocre, (p. 103)

This experience is often moving and deeply affecting. My
students’ most frequent comments after learning to draw are
“Life seems so much richer now” and “I didn’t realize how
much there is to see and how beautiful things are.” This
new way of seeing may alone be reason enough to learn to
draw.

Drawing is a curious process, so intertwined with seeing
that the two can hardly be separated. Ability to draw
depends on ability to see the way an artist sees, and this
kind of seeing can marvellously enrich your life.

Drawing

from Betty Edwards’ principles of Drawing on the Right
Side of the brain

Right-Brain Creativity Blog with information on our courses
here

… Learning to draw, then, turns out not to be “learning to
draw.” Paradoxically, “learning to draw” means learning to
make a mental shift from L-mode to R-mode. That is what a
person trained in drawing does, and that is what you can
learn.

If you can write your name you can learn to draw. Yes it’s
true. You can learn to draw and you don’t have to have an
extraordinary talent – it is simply a question of being
taught how to do so.

Over twenty years ago Dr Betty Edwards developed a teaching
method that would enable students to learn the five
perceptual skills of drawing in as little as five days.
These five skills form the global skill of drawing and once
learned, like learning to read or drive a car, they are
learnt for life.

Once you have learned these skills you will be able to draw
anything – portraits, cats, dogs, the human figure,
landscapes, architecture, hands, feet, still lifes … the
list is endless. The method is the same it is only the
complexity of your subject and the media that varies.

Learning drawing can boost your creativity and confidence.

“For most participants, one of the frequent effects is a
new self-perception as a creative and artistic person.
Whether you feel you have little talent and doubt you could
ever learn; or you enjoy drawing but have not been able to
get beyond a child-like level, these workshops will show
you how to gain and master drawing skills. If you are
already drawing as a professional artist it will give you a
greater confidence in your ability and deepen your artistic
perception.

Once learned, drawing can be used to record what you see
either in reality or in your mind’s eye, in a manner not
totally unlike the way we can record our thoughts and ideas
in words. ” (JANET RAE-DUPREE)

 

Benefits of right-brain thinking

Other creative people have deliberately employed techniques to activate the right brain for problem solving, writing ideas, and other creative solutions. Any sort of dissociation, disconnecting from the everyday world gets you there. For example, Edison is purported to have used the hypnogogic state to stimulate creativity. The hypnogogic state is that state just prior to falling asleep. He activated this state for creative problem solving by placing himself in his easy chair holding metal bearings in his hand, which was positioned over a metal bowl. Then as he relaxed into that state between sleeping and waking, called the hypnogogic state, if he fell asleep, his hand would release the metal balls, which would then wake him as they fell into the bowl. This is an example of the use of the dissociated state, which is a hallmark of the “right brain” and has been used by various means by many creative people. Most don’t understand that is what they are doing. There are many ways to activate this part of the mind. For most people repetitive activities, special music, or just day dreaming will do the job. It’s achieving a dissociative state that quiets the left brain and activates the right brain. I knew a General officer who, after getting briefed on a vexing question, would state, “that is one for jogging.” By that he meant that he would bring the question to mind while jogging. Jogging or running entails repetitive action and may also include some hypoxia known as the “runner’s high” and brings on this dissociative state.

This is actually what is going on when people say they “will sleep on it” before coming to a decision. As early as the ancient Greeks, dreams were elevated to forecast the future and provide specific guidance to the dreamer. A premium was placed on those who seemed to be able to accurately interpret the dream. When they needed healing, the ancient Greeks visited temples of Asklepios, the Greek god of healing, where priests advised them how to incubate a healing dream. Dream researchers and modern healers have resurrected and updated this ancient practice and detail a step-by-step process on how to incubate a dream. To incubate a dream means to have a dream that is focused on solving a specific problem or question. For the trans-personal therapist the dream is “the royal road to the unconscious” and the unconscious holds virtually all the clues to unraveling any problem in physical reality. There is an infinite wealth of information and guidance in the unconscious, which can be coaxed to conscious awareness for the personality’s benefit. The dream is a prime method to do this. Therefore, it is not unusual to hear of a famous writer, artist or scientist, anyone engaged in a creative process, who uses either the dream state or the transition into and out of sleep (the hypnogogic and hypnopompic states, respectively) to get specific answers, solve creative problems and get inspiration.

Image result for right brain cartoon

Benefits of The Right Brain by Richard Stammler (extracts)

Right Brain Benefits

When someone says that they are “right brained,” they are referring to the hemispheric dominance of their brain. Each side of the brain is responsible for different characteristics, and depending on the side of the brain that you use the most, you could exhibit natural characteristics. Understanding the benefits of using the right brain can give you a winning edge when it comes to personal relationships, your professional life and general success in your life. Use your strengths to get ahead and allow your right brain dominance to flourish.

Verbal Processing

When a person thinks with his right brain, verbal processing and reading comprehension come easily. This is because with a right hemispheric dominance, a person can readily convert words into pictures and ideas in his mind. When reading a book, a right-brained individual has no problem grasping the concepts and imagining the storyline, because it is open to interpretation. Subjects with hard and fast rules, like mathematics, can be a challenge, because right-brained person often need to see and read a concept visually before understanding it.

Creativity

Right-brain types are typically more creative than the more logical left-brain types. Middle Tennessee State University notes that this could be the result of the way a person who uses the right brain thinks. Right-brains enjoy abstract ideas over concrete evidences, which make creation through art, music and writing easier.

Philosophy

A right-brained person is more likely to grasp concepts in philosophy and religion, explains the Australian Herald-Sun. A left-brained person prefers to see the facts, and discern her own conclusions from those facts. If a person uses her right brain, she grasps fluid concepts that may rely on faith rather than facts more easily. This can be beneficial in understanding philosophical concepts as they are not always backed by facts.

Intuition

Because facts are not always important to those who think with their right brain, they may use intuition more readily for decision-making. Right-brained people are highly in tune with intuition, since they don’t feel that evidence is always the most important and effective way to make a choice. Rather than using rules and schedules, the right-brained person goes with feelings and emotions and chooses accordingly, according to Scholastic.com. If you think with your right brain, this makes you more in tune with your emotions, as well as the emotions of those around you.

More info on benefits of right-brain thinking

Source

 

R-mode

Useful information on right/left-brain thinking

Betty Edwards has used the terms L-Mode and R-Mode to designate two ways of knowing and seeing – the verbal, analytic mode and the visual, perceptual mode – no matter where they are located in the individual brain. You are probably aware of these different characteristics. L-mode is a step-by-step style of thinking, using words, numbers and other symbols. L-mode strings things out in sequences, like words in a sentence. R-mode on the other hand, uses visual information and processes, not step-by-step, but all at once, like recognizing the face of a friend.

“You have two brains: a left and a right. Modern brain scientists now know that your left brain is your verbal and rational brain; it thinks serially and reduces its thoughts to numbers, letters and words… Your right brain is your nonverbal and intuitive brain; it thinks in patterns, or pictures, composed of ‘whole things,’ and does not comprehend reductions, either numbers, letters, or words.” From The Fabric of Mind, by the eminent scientist and neurosurgeon, Richard Bergland. Viking Penguin, Inc., New York 1985. pg.1

Most activities require both modes, each contributing its special functions, but a few activities require mainly one mode, without interference from the other. Drawing is one of these activities.

Image result for right brain cartoon

Learning to draw, then, turns out not to be “learning to draw.” Paradoxically, “learning to draw” means learning to make a mental shift from L-mode to R-mode. That is what a person trained in drawing does, and that is what you can learn.

Since Betty Edwards, first published her book in 1979, it has been on the New York Times best seller list with more than 2.5 million copies sold. It has been translated into 13 languages and is the world’s most widely used drawing instruction book. … While the focus of the workshop is on drawing, absolutely no previous art training or special talent for drawing is necessary.

For most participants, one of the frequent effects is a new self-perception as a creative and artistic person. Whether you feel you have little talent and doubt you could ever learn; or you enjoy drawing but have not been able to get beyond a child-like level, these workshops will show you how to gain and master drawing skills. If you are already drawing as a professional artist it will give you a greater confidence in your ability and deepen your artistic perception.

Once learned, drawing can be used to record what you see either in reality or in your mind’s eye, in a manner not totally unlike the way we can record our thoughts and ideas in words.  …

Image result for right brain cartoon

Source

Left or right?

The two sides of the brain

The brain is composed of two hemispheres, the left and the right. The two sides process information very differently. The left brain is analytical, orderly, and detail oriented. It monitors behavior, and understands rules and boundaries. The right brain is intuitive, emotional, and holistic. It specializes in sounds and images, and understands relationships and humor.

The left and right hemispheres of your brain are like two completely different people. As such it’s not surprising that they play different roles in learning, and prefer different styles of learning. The left brain likes to learn from textbooks, lectures and logic, while the right brain likes to learn from pictures, stories and experiences. Everyone learns with both sides of their brain, however many individuals find one side to be dominant, and often learn better using techniques which favor that side.

While people are divided fairly equally between left- and right-brain dominance, schools tend to exclusively utilize left-brain learning techniques (textbooks, lectures, exams, memorization, etc.). Therefore right-brain learners often struggle with many subjects, especially subjects that benefit from right-brain teaching techniques utilizing sensory stimulus and hands-on experience.

Source and pic

Importance of Creativity

Creativity Just As Important As Math And Science (article)

ARtistic
Today, art education has been put on the back burner, with an increase in emphasis on math and science in our society. While this is not a bad thing in the least, it takes away from other forms of education, for example art education, of its importance.

Almost everyone has heard of the benefits of art education.  Playing an instrument promotes concentration and discipline in kids while helping improve their math skills, reading and writing music establish mental organization, and art in general promotes creativity and teach children that problems can have more than one solution and that questions can have more than one answer.

  “Creativity and creation are taught in many ways in many courses. Art is an example of a class where both are taught. I think creativity and creation are two of the most valuable skills an employee can have in any field. Thus, there is value in art,” math teacher Mr. Orsini said.

“We use a system here which is the dynamic creative process and in the dynamic creative process we teach you how to problem solve in a more abstract manner instead of a more formally driven manner.  That way when you come upon a problem in the future, you’ll be able to use the skill sets  that you use in art to come up with a creatively and out of the box way to solve a problem,” art teacher Boyles said.

Yes, science and math are essential, especially in today’s job market.  However, if we only place an emphasis on these subjects we are not only depriving kids of a good education, we are depriving them of self-expression.

As Steve Jobs once said “It is in Apple’s DNA that technology alone is not enough—its technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the results that make our heart sing.”

Source of text and pic

The third self by Mary Oliver

“Certainly there is within each of us a self that is neither a child, nor a servant of the hours. It is a third self, occasional in some of us, tyrant in others. This self is out of love with the ordinary; it is out of love with time. It has a hunger for eternity.”

A beautiful article on concentration and creativity.

“In creative work — creative work of all kinds — those who are the world’s working artists are not trying to help the world go around, but forward. Which is something altogether different from the ordinary. Such work does not refute the ordinary. It is, simply, something else. Its labor requires a different outlook — a different set of priorities”.

Mary Oliver

Piece of cake! :)

 

Art of Eileen

Crowdfunding helps artist bring creativity to aged care

101-year-old dancer, choreographer, costume designer, author, sculptor and illustrator Eileen Kramer has offered her talents to a project that aims to raise funds for art in aged care.
For the project, Art of Eileen, Kramer worked with fashion designer Brigid McLaughlin to create a range of scarves, using her own designs and McLaughlin’s ethical and environmentally sound practices.
Funds raised through the sale of the scarves will be used by Arts Health Institute (AHI) to train visual artists to deliver its program, Access to Express, in aged-care facilities.
Access to Express aims to increase quality of life for older Australians through artistic expression and cultural experiences, engaging residents in drawing, painting, sculpture and art appreciation.
Dr Maggie Haertsch, chief executive of AHI, said the campaign’s $12,000 target would allow the institute to train and employ about 20 artists to provide art-making experiences in health and aged-care settings.

Read full article here

 

 

Waltdisney@large

 

A creative person

20 Things Only Highly Creative People Would Understand – BY KEVIN KAISER

full article here – source: lifehack.org

“There’s no argument anymore. Neuroscience confirms that highly creative people think and act differently than the average person. Their brains are literally hardwired in a unique way. But that gift can often strain relationships.

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1. They have a mind that never slows down.
The creative mind is a non-stopmachine fueled by intense curiosity. There is no pause button and no way to power it down. This can be exhausting at times but it is also the source of some crazy fun activities and conversations.

2. They challenge the status quo.
Two questions drive every creative person more than any others: What if? and Why not? They question what everyone else takes at face value. While uncomfortable for those around them, it’s this ability that enables creatives to redefine what’s possible.

3. They embrace their genius even if others don’t.
Creative individuals would rather be authentic than popular. Staying true to who they are, without compromise, is how they define success even if means being misunderstood or marginalized.

4. They have difficulty staying on task.
Highly creative people are energized by taking big mental leaps and starting new things. Existing projects can turn into boring slogs when the promise of something new and exciting grabs their attention.

5. They create in cycles.
Creativity has a rhythm that flows between periods of high, sometimes manic, activity and slow times that can feel like slumps. Each period is necessary and can’t be skipped just like the natural seasons are interdependent and necessary.

6. They need time to feed their souls.
No one can drive cross-country on a single take of gas. In the same way, creative people need to frequently renew their source of inspiration and drive. Often, this requires solitude for periods of time.

7. They need space to create.
Having the right environment is essential to peak creativity. It may be a studio, a coffee shop, or a quiet corner of the house. Wherever it is, allow them to set the boundaries and respect them.

8. They focus intensely.
Highly creative people tune the entire world out when they’re focused on work. They cannot multi-task effectively and it can take twenty minutes to re-focus after being interrupted, even if the interruption was only twenty seconds.

9. They feel deeply.
Creativity is about human expression and communicating deeply. It’s impossible to give what you don’t have, and you can only take someone as far as you have gone yourself. A writer once told me that an artist must scream at the page if they want a whisper to be heard. In the same way, a creative person must feel deep if they are to communicate deeply.

10. They live on the edge of joy and depression.
Because they feel deeply, highly creative people often can quickly shift from joy to sadness or even depression. Their sensitive heart, while the source of their brilliance, is also the source of their suffering.

11. They think and speak in stories.
Facts will never move the human heart like storytelling can. Highly creative people, especially artists, know this and weave stories into everything they do. It takes longer for them to explain something, explaining isn’t the point. The experience is.

12. They battle Resistance every day.
Steven Pressfield, author of The War of Art, writes:

“Most of us have two lives. The life we live, and the unlived life within us. Between the two stands Resistance.”

Highly creative people wake up every morning, fully aware of the need to grow and push themselves. But there is always the fear, Resistance as Pressfield calls it, that they don’t have what it takes. No matter how successful the person, that fear never goes away. They simply learn to deal with it, or not.

13. They take their work personally.
Creative work is a raw expression of the person who created it. Often, they aren’t able to separate themselves from it, so every critique is seen either as a validation or condemnation of their self-worth.

14. They have a hard time believing in themselves.
Even the seemingly self-confident creative person often wonders, Am I good enough? They constantly compare their work with others and fail to see their own brilliance, which may be obvious to everyone else.

15. They are deeply intuitive.
Science still fails to explain the How and Why of creativity. Yet, creative individuals know instinctively how to flow in it time and again. They will tell you that it can’t be understood, only experienced firsthand.

16. They often use procrastination as a tool.
Creatives are notorious procrastinators because many do their best work under pressure. They will subconsciously, and sometimes purposefully, delay their work until the last minute simply to experience the rush of the challenge.

17. They are addicted to creative flow.
Recent discoveries in neuroscience reveal that “the flow state” might be the most addictive experience on earth. The mental and emotional payoff is why highly creative people will suffer through the highs and lows of creativity. It’s the staying power. In a real sense, they are addicted to the thrill of creating.

18. They have difficulty finishing projects.
The initial stage of the creative process is fast moving and charged with excitement. Often, they will abandon projects that are too familiar in order to experience the initial flow that comes at the beginning.

19. They connect dots better than others.
True creativity, Steve Jobs once said, is little more than connecting the dots. It’s seeing patterns before they become obvious to everyone else.

20. They will never grow up.
Creatives long to see through the eyes of a child and never lose a sense of wonder. For them, life is about mystery, adventure, and growing young. Everything else is simply existing, and not true living.”

IMG_13513190336919

Children need art, stories, poems, music …

“Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play. “
Article here

“Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play. If you don’t give a child food, the damage quickly becomes visible. If you don’t let a child have fresh air and play, the damage is also visible, but not so quickly. If you don’t give a child love, the damage might not be seen for some years, but it’s permanent.

The effects of cultural starvation are not dramatic and swift. They’re not so easily visible.

And, as I say, some people, good people, kind friends and helpful citizens, just never experience it; they’re perfectly fulfilled without it. If all the books and all the music and all the paintings in the world were to disappear overnight, they wouldn’t feel any the worse; they wouldn’t even notice.

But that hunger exists in many children, and often it is never satisfied because it has never been awakened. Many children in every part of the world are starved for something that feeds and nourishes their soul in a way that nothing else ever could or ever would.

We say, correctly, that every child has a right to food and shelter, to education, to medical treatment, and so on. We must understand that every child has a right to the experience of culture. We must fully understand that without stories and poems and pictures and music, children will starve.”

Pullman Philip 2

Healing with Art

The maker

 

Recipes for life!

Red Sky Studios

 

 

Creativity and Giving

The creative process

Consistent with research I did with fellow PT blogger Scott Barry Kaufman, Fiore illustrates that if it takes ten years or so to make a professional contribution to a field, it takes about ten more years to make a truly outstanding mark.

What does this mean? It takes time to become an “expert” in a field and even longer to reach a level of “greatness.” It’s okay to not be a superstar yet.

Source

In a brief speech, he articulated nearly everything I know about how to encourage creativity:

When I was nine and I asked my dad, “Can I have your movie camera? That old, wind-up 8 millimeter camera that was in your drawer?” And he goes, “Sure, take it.” And I took it and I started making movies with it and I started being as creative as I could, and never once in my life did my parents ever say, “What you’re doing is a waste of time.” Never. And I grew up, I had teachers, I had colleagues, I had people that I worked with all through my life who always told me what you’re doing is not a waste of time. So that was normal to me that it was OK to do that. I know there are kids out there that don’t have that support system so if you’re out there and you’re listening, listen to me: If you want to be creative, get out there and do it. It’s not a waste of time. Do it. OK? Thank you.

Yes! How do we nurture creativity? We allow mini-c (the initial creativity inherent in the learning process) flourish. We allow an environment to be psychologically “safe” from judgment and discouragement. We encourage people to pursue what they love.

Source

Picture diary 101

A few months back, after having seen  many ‘colouring books’ claiming to have healing powers and calming the mind, I decided to create my own colouring book in the form of a diary. Here is the result. Naturally, I have not included all the entries – some ended up being very personal!

I can’t even start explaining the sheer pleasure of creating these images. They capture my days, my feelings and thoughts and at the same time they gave me enormous pleasure of colouring my own designs.

I cannot emphasize enought the healing power of art!

Why don’t you give it a try (and share it with me!)

Picture Diaries

The drawings are all under copyright! Spirit'n Art Delightful Creations

Children need art

“Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play. “

Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play. If you don’t give a child food, the damage quickly becomes visible. If you don’t let a child have fresh air and play, the damage is also visible, but not so quickly. If you don’t give a child love, the damage might not be seen for some years, but it’s permanent.

But if you don’t give a child art and stories and poems and music, the damage is not so easy to see. It’s there, though. Their bodies are healthy enough; they can run and jump and swim and eat hungrily and make lots of noise, as children have always done, but something is missing.

It’s true that some people grow up never encountering art of any kind, and are perfectly happy and live good and valuable lives, and in whose homes there are no books, and they don’t care much for pictures, and they can’t see the point of music. Well, that’s fine. I know people like that. They are good neighbours and useful citizens.”

Pullman Philip 2

Written by Philip Pullman for the tenth anniversary of the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award in 2012. More from Philip Pullman here.